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Hai le chiavi della gabbia, ma non vuoi uscire

Like the clothes we wear, the cars we drive, or the houses we live in, our photographs are another vehicle to which the world judges us because the world expects to see proof of our beautiful, happy lives and we have grown to crave that attention. In this light, photography has grown vain in its old age.

We shoot, we shoot, and we shoot… and then we share. Sometimes to prove our good taste or creative ability, but also, in many cases, as a means to feel alive because we have generated this need to prove something to others and to ourselves.

Don’t Forget To Remember This

Pensate non sia abbastanza inquietante?
Provate ad aggiungerci questo:

“The implication is that if you don’t have it [privacy – NdR], you haven’t earned the right or aren’t capable or trustworthy,” said Christena Nippert-Eng, professor of sociology at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago and author of “Islands of Privacy.”

So it’s not surprising that privacy research in both online and offline environments has shown that just the perception, let alone the reality, of being watched results in feelings of low self-esteem, depression and anxiety. Whether observed by a supervisor at work or Facebook friends, people are inclined to conform and demonstrate less individuality and creativity. Their performance of tasks suffers and they have elevated pulse rates and levels of stress hormones.

We want privacy but can’t stop sharing

Una sorta di masochistico circolo vizioso, senza nemmeno che il vizio sia quindi uno di quelli “piacevoli”, e ci lucrano anche sopra – tra l’atro in modi che nemmeno ci sono troppo chiari.

Mi ricorda il principio che rende (più) inquietante Black Mirror: le tecnologie ed i comportamenti distopici non sono imposti, ma scelti liberamente.
Forse per la ragione che ipotizza Filippo Corti, o magari ha ragione Loki (però poi non gli va granché bene 🙂 ).

Stay Tuned,
Mr.Frost