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A bocce ferme

A lot of it boils down to this concept: We demand Apple innovate, but we insist they don’t change anything.

Uno dei post piu lucidi che abbia letto finora sui tanto criticati nuovi MacBookPro.

Sugli orribili adattatori:

My laptop has a power port, an SD card port, 3 Thunderbolt ports and two USB ports. I know that in the four years I’ve owned it, I’ve never used the SD card, I use the Power port, one Thunderbolt port, and occasionally plug a USB cable in. So half the ports in this thing are never used — and yet I paid for them because they were built into the computer.

That’s the issue that defines dongles: Should 100% of buyers pay for a feature when only 5% of the owners will use it? Or 10%? How many users will need a feature before you think it ought to be required for everyone to buy it as part of the device? Where do you draw that line?

Su Apple che non sa cosa voglia la propria clientela (e sul non sentirsi nicchia quando palesemente lo si è):

The fact is, the Mac product line itself is becoming a niche product, because the days of the personal computer have started the shift back to where computers will be a hobby for the nerd and for the mainstream user, devices which use computers to enable tasks are starting to replace them: that includes tablets, but also gaming consoles and whatever it is that will ultimately take ownership of the living room.

This is sad if you’re a computer nerd, but it means these technologies have gone mainstream and we have to remember most people aren’t interested for computers as computers, they are interested in solving problems, and use computers for doing that.

How Apple could have avoided much of the controversy

Stay Tuned,
Mr.Frost